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Paper Code  
Title   Microbial properties regulate spatial variation in the differences in heterotrophic respiration and its temperature sensitivity between primary and secondary forests from tropical to cold-temperate zones
Authors   Wang Qing, He Nianpeng, Xu Li, Zhou Xuhui
Corresponding Author  
Year   2018
Title of Journal  
Volume   262
Number  
Page  
Abstract   Large quantities of forest products globally have been lumbered, resulting in widespread conversion from primary forests [PFs] to secondary forests [SFs]. This transformation has exerted important impacts on the global carbon [C] cycle. Therefore, it is essential to clarify how soil C, which is a vital component of the global C pool, responds to the converting of forests from PFs to SFs, in parallel to identifying the underlying mechanisms. Here, nine paired (PFs and SFs) soil samples (0-10 cm) were obtained from tropical to cold-temperate zones along the north-south transect of eastern China (NSTEC). The heterotrophic respiration rate [R-H] as per soil organic C at a reference temperature of 20 degrees C [R20-C] and its temperature sensitivity [Q(10)] were measured and calculated through 14 d incubation experiments. Our results showed that most of R-20(-C) and Q(10)( )in SFs were greater than those in PFs. Strong spatial variation in the differences in R-20(-C) and Q(10) between PFs and SFs [Delta R-20(-C), Delta Q(10)] was observed along the NSTEC, with the greatest Delta R20-C, Delta Q(10) being detected in the soils of mid-latitude forests. Overall, 83.2% of the spatial variation in Delta R20-C was explained by physical-chemical and microbial properties, which contributed 68.5% and 52.4% variation solely, respectively. Similarly, 79% of the variation in Delta Q(10)( )between PFs and SFs was explained by microbial properties, physical-chemical properties, and dissolved organic C, which contributed 81.6%, 10.5%, and 9% variation solely, respectively. Overall, our findings demonstrate high spatial variation in Delta R-H and Delta Q(10 )between PFs and SFs, which was mainly explained by microbial properties of soils.
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Classification: SCI
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Title of Journal: AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST METEOROLOGY
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